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17 Consequences You Can Face with a Criminal Conviction
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17 Consequences You Can Face with a Criminal Conviction

 

Everyone knows that criminal convictions can result in consequences such as hefty fines and lengthy prison sentences. But other consequences of conviction can also profoundly affect the life of the convicted individual – as well as that person’s loved ones.

 

The burdens placed on a convicted criminal can make it difficult for that person to re-enter society and live a productive life as a good citizen. Below we’re going to cover 17 collateral consequences of a criminal conviction in the state of Colorado.

 

  1. Revocation of Your Driver’s License: Certain convictions, such as those pertaining to underage drinking, misrepresenting your age, or drinking and driving in general, may result in a driver’s license revocation.
  2. Permanent Records: If arrested, your photographs and fingerprints are put into a permanent criminal record that can be accessed by anyone who conducts a background check.
  3. Drug/Alcohol Education: If you have been convicted of a DUI, you may be required to complete a drug and alcohol education or treatment program.
  4. Ineligible for Public Assistance: Certain crimes, including food stamp fraud, not only render them ineligible for benefits, but also their entire household.
  5. No Record Sealing: Depending on the crime in question, it may not be possible to seal your criminal record.
  6. Ineligible to Adopt: Certain crimes, such as those involving child abuse or a crime of violence, may cause a person to be ineligible to adopt or become a foster home provider.
  7. Housing Difficulties: Once convicted of a crime, it may become difficult to lease or rent a house or apartment, as a criminal background is available to landlords.
  8. Job Difficulties: If convicted, you may be prohibited from maintaining certain professions, such as those in law enforcement, child care, or the medical field.
  9. Financial Aid Ban: In some instances, a conviction will prevent you from obtaining financial aid for college.
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  10. Political Privileges: Until your sentence is completed, you may be prohibited from voting or holding a place in public office.
  11. Sex Offender Status: If convicted of a sex offense, you will be required to register as a sexual predator or sex offender for the remainder of your life.
  12. Child Care Funds: Convictions of violence may deem an individual ineligible to receive state child care assistance funds.
  13. Loss of Certification: Certain child support offenses may result in the termination of an occupational or professional license or certification.
  14. Deny Broker’s License: Any type of felony and various crimes involving fraud can result in a denial of a real estate broker’s license.
  15. Ineligible for Landlord License: If convicted of a felony or a crime involving fraud, you may become ineligible for a landlord license.
  16. Loss of Parenting Time: Certain crimes of violence, including sex offenses, may result in the loss of parenting time, custody, or visitation.
  17. Ineligible to Possess Firearm: Individuals convicted of certain crimes may lose their right to possess and/or carry a firearm.

 

As you can see, a conviction in the state of Colorado can carry some harsh repercussions. If you have been arrested or learn that you are under investigation for any type of crime, you need to protect yourself with the strongest defense possible – not just for yourself, but for the people that you love.

 

 

About the Author:

 

Kimberly Diego is a criminal defense attorney in Denver practicing at The Law Office of Kimberly Diego. She obtained her undergraduate degree from Georgetown University and her law degree at the University of Colorado. She was named one of Super Lawyers’ “Rising Stars of 2012” and “Top 100 Trial Lawyers in Colorado” for 2012 and 2013 by The National Trial Lawyers. Both honors are limited to a small percentage of practicing attorneys in each state.  She has also been recognized for her work in domestic violence cases.