Category: Drug Crimes

 

Drug-free zone laws enacted during the 1980’s “War on Drugs” were meant to discourage drug activity near schools and other places children frequent, and protect them from drug trafficking activity. It sounded like a good idea at the time, and in theory, few would argue against this premise.

 

In practice, however, drug-free zones aren’t necessarily effective deterrents. Instead, they often simply impose unreasonably harsh penalties, and include drug

 

When most of us think of “drug trafficking,” we imagine drug dealers moving large amounts of drugs. Moreover, we tend to think of large criminal operations and drug trafficking networks. Cartels. Warehouses filled with “merchandise.”

 

This is a common misconception.

 

In fact, drug trafficking is actually one of the most confusing legal concepts. While trafficking can consist of moving drugs from one location to another, in reality

 

Despite national perceptions, many Colorado drug laws have actually gotten more restrictive over the last few years, and we are seeing the effects of those changes here in the Denver area in a big way.

 

If you are facing drug trafficking charges, you probably have a million questions running through your mind. At our office, we’re constantly getting asked many of the same questions, so we thought we’d

 

One of the results of the War on Drugs is that most drug crimes carry an incredibly severe mandatory sentence – especially when they are tried at the federal level. Because of this, it is important to understand how a charge could potentially get federal attention instead of being fought in state court.

 

In this post, we’re going to detail the various factors that might lead to drug

 

The US constitution protects citizens against unwarranted search and seizures. This means that unless police have a warrant or probable cause, they cannot search your person or vehicle for illegal substances.

 

However, the definition of probable cause is surprisingly complex when you start delving into it.

 

This is particularly true in the case of drug-sniffing dogs. Police are allowed to use these animals to alert them to