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FREE CASE REVIEW

Criminal Impersonation

What is Criminal Impersonation?

 

A person has committed criminal impersonation if they assume a false identity, and also

– Marry, or pretend to marry, or
– Become bail or surety for a party in an action or proceeding, civil or criminal, or
– Confess a judgment, or subscribes, publishes, acknowledges, or proves a written instrument which by law may be recorded, with the intent that this written instrument be presented as true; or
– Does an act which if done by the person falsely impersonated, might subject such person to an action, civil or criminal, or to liability, charge, forfeiture, or penalty; or
– Does any other act with intent to unlawfully gain a benefit for himself or to injure or defraud another.

In essence, criminal impersonation occurs when you use someone else’s identity in order to gain some benefit for yourself, whether that benefit is financial, or some other type of benefit.

 

What is the Possible Punishment for Criminal Impersonation?

 

Criminal impersonation is a class 6 felony, punishable by one year to eighteen months in the department of corrections. Depending upon your criminal history, a probationary sentence or sentence to community corrections may also be possible.

 

Immigration Consequences of Criminal Impersonation Charges

 

A charge of criminal impersonation is considered a crime involving moral turpitude. It can block your application for a visa or green card, or if you already have a visa or green card, it can prevent you from showing the good character necessary to become a citizen. Additionally, it could lead to your removal from the country.

 

How Could a Criminal Impersonation Charge Impact You?

 

A criminal impersonation charge could negatively impact your ability to maintain and secure employment. Because criminal impersonation is essentially an identity theft crime, such a conviction could cause someone to draw negative conclusions about you.

 

Even if you are guilty, do not accept the first plea disposition extended to you by the prosecuting attorney. Consult first with a defense attorney experienced in successfully resolving similar cases, who can advise you as to the best way to resolve your case. Everyone makes mistakes, but one mistake should not be allowed to destroy or otherwise unnecessarily limit your future.

 

If you have been charged with criminal impersonation, contact defense attorney Kimberly Diego today for a free consultation to discuss your case.

 

To schedule a free initial consultation, call 720-257-5346 or fill out a free case review form, and a representative from the Law Office of Kimberly Diego will contact you as soon as possible.